July 2014, Guilin – Reed Flute Cave 芦笛岩

Truth: I researched the name “Reed Flute Cave” from the Internet. I seriously have this travel habit now where I go to awesome places and have a wonderful time shooting pictures, but if it’s not the Eiffel Tower or anything, I don’t remember the name – or even make an effort to. 😦 New resolution made, right here and right now!

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute Cave

Anyway, this was already our last day in Guilin. Having finished what we had set out to do, we were whisked to Yangshuo; the next day, the itinerary was actually up to us. Leafing through the brochures, Reed Flute Cave looked nice with all the limestone, lights and whatnot, so off we went!

Guilin Reed Flute CaveTo start with, I intentionally put this shot because:

1) The first few shots quickly taught me that it was low-light, and no matter how steady I kept my hands, it kept coming out blurry. Time to furiously adjust the settings!

2) Doesn’t it look like a haunted place? 😀

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveSo here we are! Majority of the inside of the Reed Flute cave looks like this – artificially lighted. On certain places it works, but I’m not so sure the technicolor works for me as a whole. Perhaps it reads a little cheap? But then, it’s nothing new as the Chinese are known to love putting as many colours as they can on natural formations like these. Such a shame…

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveAgain, this is a focal point of the cave, but I didn’t get to jot down the name. *bad blogger* Can I just make it up to you by informing you that the whole inside of the cave was actually quite cold? You know, like breezy Christmas wind cold. It sure was a relief to be inside after baking in the sun outside!

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveAll of the formations inside are natural limestone. I was quite awestruck at seeing so much limestone in one place, and even touched pillars here and there. They felt cold and clammy!

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveTHIS ONE I REMEMBER! *triumphant face* It’s something like the “Princess Bath Lake” (Chinese names are always awkward when translated like that), and legend goes that the princess of some dynasty or yore went there to take a bath… and magic happened? Sorry, just registered the bath thing! 😮

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveFinally, we got out of the cave! With a normal pace of walking, you might take around 30 to 40 minutes. Although it was cool inside, the mixed odor of the smelly native Chinese (ESPECIALLY THE SMOKERS!) makes you want to faint after a while. And really, I’m not the faint-y type of girl, so that says a lot!

Guilin Reed Flute CaveGuilin Reed Flute CaveOn our way out, we saw this wall that was designed to be like one of those games in the amusement parks where you shoot something inside, but what you have to actually shoot inside are your COINS. Funny thing was, just walk a little more after this area, and you can see the tubes and money boxes attached to the back of this wall, and you can hear the clink-clink of the coins going down. Seriously, if you were foolish enough to get tricked, and realized that at the end, you couldn’t get your money back anyway, could you? 😀

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